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2023 FRANCE HOLIDAYS

The next public holiday in France is

25th December, SundayChristmas Day

List of National and Regional Public Holidays of France in 2023

DAYDATEHOLIDAY
SundaySunJan 01, 2023Jan 01New Year's Day
FridayFriApr 07, 2023Apr 07Good Friday
SundaySunApr 09, 2023Apr 09Easter Sunday
MondayMonApr 10, 2023Apr 10Easter Monday
MondayMonMay 01, 2023May 01Labor day
MondayMonMay 08, 2023May 08Victory in WWII Day
ThursdayThuMay 18, 2023May 18Ascension Day
SundaySunMay 28, 2023May 28Whit Sunday
MondayMonMay 29, 2023May 29Whit Monday
FridayFriJul 14, 2023Jul 14Bastille Day
TuesdayTueAug 15, 2023Aug 15Assumption Day
WednesdayWedNov 01, 2023Nov 01All Saints Day
SaturdaySatNov 11, 2023Nov 11Armistice Day
MondayMonDec 25, 2023Dec 25Christmas Day
TuesdayTueDec 26, 2023Dec 26St Stephen's Day

Public Holidays in France

Christmas Day

Christmas Day

Sunday Dec 25, 2022

The upcoming France holiday Christmas Day is in 22 days from today.

St Stephen's Day

St Stephen's Day

Monday Dec 26, 2022

The upcoming France holiday St Stephen's Day is in 23 days from today.

New Year's Day

New Year's Day

Sunday Jan 01, 2023

The upcoming France holiday New Year's Day is in 29 days from today.

List of Popular Celebration Days of United States in 2023

DAYDATEHOLIDAY
FridayFriJun 02, 2023Jun 02National Donut Day

2023 Public Holidays France Service

The above is the list of 2023 public holidays declared in France which includes federal, regional government holidays and popular observances. We also provide France holiday calendar for 2023 in Word, Excel, PDF and printable online formats.

The French republic officially observes 11 public holidays. Five of these are civil holidays (New Year’s Day, May Day, Victory in Europe Day, Bastille Day and WWI Armistice Day) and the others six have a religious origin based on the Catholic faith (Easter Monday, Ascension Day, Whit Monday, Assumption Day, All Saints’ Day, and Christmas). The Alsace region and the Moselle department, however, have two additional holidays that they commemorate.

The French law states that work should stop, but be paid, only for the Fête du Travail (May Day, 1st May), unless it is in businesses where it is not feasible to stop work. The other public holidays are listed in statute law; and for these, the law does not provide that action stops. A leave from one’s job may only, however, be granted by an employer or through a trade union. The right to a paid holiday rests on the freedom of choice between the employer and employee either through a contract or bargaining agreement as dictated by trade unions.

In the French Republic, if the holiday occurs on the weekend, no time off is given to the employee. Most establishments, however, let their employees take the preceding Friday off as a “bridge” day, allowing for an extended four-day weekend. Unlike other European countries, if a public holiday falls on a Sunday, French employees are not legally entitled to take the following Monday off as a paid holiday. That translates to the average number of public holidays on French weekdays being 8.7. The number every year ranges from 7 to 10. Majority of Asian countries and all North American countries have between 2 and ten more public holidays every other year on weekdays.